WEEKEND OFF: Movies for a loving lady


This article is a part of the series to discover female career paths within the creative and digital industries

Read the series by @rtumasonyte


WORKING LADY NEEDS A THERAPY!

13 movies to put you in the lovely mood. Develop your emotional intellect, sensitivity and femininity. Look at the Ladies Of All Time. Get inspired. Train dignity in ego-free manner.

An Affair to Remember


An Affair to RememberAn A

 An Affair to Remember

Nickie Ferrante (Cary Grant), a playboy and aspiring artist, meets Terry McKay (Deborah Kerr) on a transatlantic journey, but both of them are already in a relationship. The two develop a friendship aboard the ship that soon blossoms into love. Upon returning to New York, they vow to meet atop the Empire State Building in six months, single and having started new careers. Unfortunately, fate intervenes in a devastating way, making it even harder for the lovestruck duo to reunite.

Starring: Cary Grant, Deborah Kerr

Released: 1957

The Artist

The Artist

The Artist

This sentimental (almost) silent film about George Valentin, a famous actor swiftly fading into obscurity with the advent of “talkies,” and the woman who loves him, Peppy Miller—a non-silent actress climbing to the top of Hollywood marquees, is a top contender for this year’s Best Picture Oscar. And did we mention Uggie, the adorable Jack Russell terrier that some movie bloggers wanted to see nominated for Best Supporting Actor? Yeah, he’s that good.

Starring: Jean Dujardin, Bérénice Bejo, John Goodman

Released: 2011

Amélie

Amélie

Amélie

This Technicolor French charmer tells the story of Amélie Poulain, a gamine Parisienne who decides to meddle in her friends and father’s lives to improve them for the better. Along the way, the girl who always does for others finally finds love herself.

Starring: Audrey Tatou, Nino Quincampoix

Released: 2001

The Notebook

The Notebook

The Notebook

Poor boy (Ryan Gosling) and rich girl (Rachel McAdams) fall in love during a hazy Southern summer in the 1930s. Fifty years later, an elderly man reads their story to a woman with Alzheimer’s in a nursing home. Please fetch the tissues; we’ll just be over here watching the famous “kiss in the rain” scene on repeat.

Starring: Ryan Gosling, Rachel McAdams

Released: 2004

The Graduate

The Graduate

The Graduate

A boyish college graduate named Benjamin Braddock (Dustin Hoffman) returns to his parents’ house in California and is seduced by the original cougar, Mrs. Robinson. When Benjamin starts to fall for the Robinsons’ daughter, Elaine; however, the ghost of her mother’s affair looms large over the budding romance.

Starring: Dustin Hoffman, Anne Bancroft

Released: 1967

Chocolat

Chocolat

Chocolat

What happens when a single mother tries to open a gourmet chocolate shop in a deeply religious and conservative rural French town in the 1960s? A romantic tale starring Johnny Depp (he’s always welcome in our romantic flicks) and a town transformed when the inhabitants learn to open their hearts to change and acceptance.

Starring: Juliette Binoche, Johnny Depp, Judi Dench

Released: 2000

Breakfast at Tiffany's

Breakfast at Tiffany’s

Breakfast at Tiffany’s

Audrey Hepburn stars as Holly Golightly, a seemingly sophisticated society girl who bonds with Paul, a struggling writer in her building. But appearances are not always what they seem, and Paul is soon enmeshed in Holly’s world of mobsters, Hollywood agents, and estranged husbands. Watch this one wearing your favorite LBD and pearls.

Starring: Audrey Hepburn, George Peppard

Released: 1961

When Harry Met Sally

When Harry Met Sally

When Harry Met Sally

Can a man and woman ever be “just friends?” That’s what this romantic comedy sets out to prove. We don’t want to ruin it for those of you who have yet to see it, so we’ll leave it at this: “I’ll have what she’s having.”

Starring: Billy Crystal, Meg Ryan

Released: 1989

Sleepless in Seattle

Sleepless in Seattle

Sleepless in Seattle

Tom Hanks plays a lonely widower who is, yes, sleepless in Seattle. Annie (Meg Ryan) is a loyal listener to a radio show Hanks’ character’s son calls in an attempt to help his grieving father find love again. If only these two had cell phones—the whole meeting atop the Empire State Building scene (based on Annie’s favorite movie, An Affair to Remember) would have been much less fraught with tension. Then again, where’s the fun in that?

Starring: Tom Hanks, Meg Ryan

Released: 1993

Pride & Prejudice

Pride & Prejudice

Pride & Prejudice

The story is based on Jane Austen’s novel about five sisters – Jane, Elizabeth, Mary, Kitty and Lydia Bennet – in Georgian England. What woman doesn’t long for her own Mr. Darcy to confess she has “bewitched him, body and soul?”

Starring: Keira Knightley, Matthew Macfadyen

Released: 2005

Nine 1/2 Weeks

Nine 1/2 Weeks

Nine 1/2 Weeks

This film veers into the erotic side of romantic with sex games, the famous fridge scene, and more kinkiness.

Starring: Kim Basinger, Mickey Rourke

Released: 1986

The American President

The American President

The American President

Before Aaron Sorkin explored the inner drama of the White House in The West Wing, he wrote this romantic comedy about a widowed president who falls in love with an environmental lobbyist.

Starring: Michael Douglas, Annette Bening

Released: 1995

Little Manhattan

Little Manhattan

Little Manhattan

An adorable 11-year-old experiences love for the first time when he reunites with a kindergarten friend in karate class. It doesn’t get much sweeter than that.

Starring: Josh Hutcherson, Charlie Ray

Released: 2005

P.S. Reasons To Stop The Housework has 25 (!) pop-corn recipes that will rock your movie night!

Popcorn for your movie night by reasonstoskipthehousework.com

Popcorn for your movie night by reasonstoskipthehousework.com

Please share your movie ideas in the comments below!

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Part of the series to discover female career paths within the creative and digital industries 

by Ramune Tumasonyte

have a question? twitter@rtumasonyte

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